Tuesday, May 15, 2007

Bullets and Hammers - A Bad Combination


Yes, the following seems like a terribly dumb idea. But is it possible that this kid was not stupid but simply so unaware of the danger involved?

LAKE LUZERNE, N.Y. - A teenager who put bullets in a vise and whacked them with a hammer to empty the brass shell casings was wounded in the abdomen by approximately the 100th bullet he hit, according to Warren County deputies.

Damion M. Mosher, 18, had been discharging .223-caliber rounds, placing them in a steel vise, putting a screwdriver on the primer, and striking the screwdriver with the hammer, deputies said.

Deputies were called to his home in Lake Luzerne shortly after 5 p.m. Saturday when one bullet went about a half-inch into his abdomen. He was treated at Glens Falls Hospital and was released. No charges were filed.

Mosher told authorities he was trying to empty the rounds to collect the brass casings for scrap.

Sheriff Larry Cleveland said about 100 other rounds that Mosher hit had "fizzled," but one was somehow sent with more force. It was unclear if the bullet ricocheted or hit him directly.

An employee of Capitol Scrap Co. in Albany said Monday the business pays $1.70 a pound for scrap brass shell casings.

Cleveland said Mosher's shells amounted to just a few pounds.

Lake Luzerne, at the southeastern edge of the Adirondacks, is 45 miles north of Albany.

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Information from: The Post-Star, http://www.poststar.com

4 comments:

bllew said...

Live .223 rounds on uncertain provenance would bring .10-.15/each.
The kid has no grasp of economics either.

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William said...

I always wondered what would happen if you did that.
I hear a story about a kid playing with a shotgun shell throwing it on the ground not thinking anything would happen eventually had it go off and hit his eye.

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